Friday, February 15, 2013

a Rose is a Rose

Rose de Mai

 

Rose de Mai

About the Cultivar

From Wiki: "Rosa × centifolia (lit. hundred leaved/petaled rose; syn. R. gallica var. centifolia (L.) Regel), the provence rose or cabbage rose or Rose de Mai is a hybrid rose developed by Dutch rose breeders in the period between the 17th century and the 19th century, possibly earlier. It is a complex hybrid bred from Rosa gallica, Rosa moschata, Rosa canina, and Rosa damascena (Huxley 1992); its exact hereditary history is not well documented."
 The oil I use is from Eden Botanicals:

Rose de Mai Absolute

  • Botanical Name: Rosa centifolia
  • Origin: Egypt
  • Process: Solvent Extracted Absolute
  • Plant Part: Flowers
  • Cultivation: Cultivated
  • Grade: Fine Perfumery Grade
  • Note: Middle Note
  • Aroma: Distinctive, smooth, with the soft, delicate sweetness of a fresh bouquet of roses. Excellent tenacity.

These are the roses you know from a warm spring day, when the earth is still cool to touch and the grass soft under bare feet, the sun touches your skin and the breeze lifts a lock of hair, and all you're wearing is a little sun dress and a big smile; as time slows, with your nose buried in the petals, you can even hear the pulse of butterfly wings overhead.

You stopped to smell the roses on the way to pick peas for dinner, but are now inspired to cut a bouquet to place next to the bed for a little afternoon delight, because you're both a little sweaty from morning chores and he smells like smoke from the BarBQ.

This is my favorite rose note - it is fresh and vibrant, the breath of Joie de vivre. It brightens blends that are sultry and maybe a little too deep, lifting them up and making them just right for day-to-day enjoyment. 



Rose damascena 

Rose damascena

About the Cultivar

From Wiki: "Rosa × damascena, more commonly known as the Damask rose (Arabic: الوردة الدمشقية‎), the Damascus rose, or sometimes as the Rose of Castile, is a rose hybrid, derived from Rosa gallica and Rosa moschata.[1] Further DNA analysis has shown that a third species, Rosa fedtschenkoana, is associated with the Damask rose.[2]
The flowers are renowned for their fine fragrance, and are commercially harvested for rose oil (either "rose otto" or "rose absolute") used in perfumery and to make rose water and "rose concrete". The flower petals are also sometimes used directly to flavor food or to make tea and are considered safe for human consumption."
This is the rose absolute and otto you see named Moroccon, Bulgarian, Turkish, Egyptian, and so forth. The qualities of the product from these growing regions are varied and distinct, even though it is the same cultivar of rose. Although I don't have the experience or ability to sample many essences, the oils I have seem to be consistent with other reviews and monographs. As for what makes them so different, there are probably factors like weather and other local conditions that vary from year to year, such that each crop will have distinctive features, much the way weather and soil conditions contribute to the qualities of a crop of grapes and the wine that is produced from year to year.

Moroccan

  • Botanical Name: Rosa damascena
  • Origin: Morocco
  • Process: Solvent Extracted Absolute
  • Plant Part: Flowers
  • Cultivation: Cultivated
  • Grade: Perfumery Grade
  • Note: Middle Note
  • Aroma: Warm, sweet with soft spicy undertones. Excellent tenacity.

You keep your Moroccan rose oil in a cut glass stoppered bottle near the soaking tub, and while your skin is still flushed and damp from a steaming soak, you massage a few drops onto softest skin. Even if you stay at home for the evening, the heady scent suggests a clingy dress and skinny heels with a strap around the ankle. Irresistible!

The subtle spice and warmth of Moroccan rose absolute insists that you reserve it for those blends designed and intended for up close and personal moments -- this is not your grandma's rose. Moroccan rose can be exulted with a tiny touch of exotic jasmine or ylang ylang; add a little spice to the floral blends to keep them warmer and bring out the rose's own spice. Moroccan works for him, too, when blended with earth and wood notes, broadening and smoothing them without being too sweet.

Bulgarian

Bulgaria Otto & Bulgarian Absolute

  • Botanical Name: Rosa damascena
  • Origin: Bulgaria
  • Process: Steam Distilled Essential Oil
  • Plant Part: Flowers
  • Cultivation: Cultivated, Certified Organic (NOP, EU)
  • Grade: Therapeutic Grade / Fine Perfumery Grade
  • Note: Middle Note
  • Aroma: Extremely complex, sweet and full-bodied, a fine quality oil from the region best known for producing the world’s most premium roses.

The weekend at the shore was short and sweet, but now your skin is a little chapped and there are a few places where the sun penetrated too deeply even though you spritzed with rose water and stayed in the shade. Every morning and evening for several days you apply cool, sweet rose lotion to those tender areas, restoring suppleness and health quickly and naturally.

This is indeed your grandmother's rose -- the rose of tea parties and lady fingers, deep bosoms and plump babies.

But it's also the rose of antiquity. Rose water, Turkish Delight, rose flavored tea and classic perfumes have sung this rose's song for many centuries. This is the rose that ornaments embroidered lace and fine china teacups, portraits and upholstery, coins and architecture. Don't discount this proud note, because it will lend dignity and refinement to sassy, sophisticated, and smart blends alike.

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